Contested and Uncontested Divorce

By on 8-05-2015 in Technology

Divorce is almost always an emotional experience, because of the separation itself and how it can affect not just yourself, but also your spouse and children. Also, according to the website of these Fort Worth divorce lawyers, divorce can be a complicated legal process. So, aside from the emotions, you also have to handle the legalities involved in divorce.

The first step to effectively handle these legalities is to have a background on divorce and its two general kinds – contested and uncontested.

Contested Divorce

The divorce is called contested if the spouses involved have a disagreement regarding the terms of the separation. Usually, the disagreements are in the financial aspect, such as child support, spousal support, and division of properties, or in the personal aspect, such as child custody.

These aspects have equivalent laws surrounding them, so most of the time, contested divorce require attorneys to help the spouses navigate the law to their advantage.

Also, because of the argumentative nature of contested divorce, it is often emotional and personal, so there is a lot of room for hate. This can result into more hard feelings between the spouses, not to mention that it can prolong the divorce process.

Because of attorney fees and long divorce processes, contested divorce is often more expensive, but at least the parties are able to effectively compromise.

Uncontested Divorce

The divorce is called uncontested if the spouses have very few or no disagreements at all. Because there is no need to fully navigate laws regarding common dispute areas, it is possible to pull off this kind of divorce even without a lawyer.

Because of the lack of disagreements, the divorce process also has less room for legal errors and is accomplished faster. This, of course, translates to less expenses because there will be little to no attorney fees and minimal court fees.

But like contested divorce, uncontested divorce is not perfect. Those who choose this kind of divorce are likely to give in to biases, because they do not want to go through the complications of contesting the terms of the separation, so they just give in to the demands of their spouses.

Does my small business need a lawyer?

By on 8-05-2015 in Technology

Small businesses continue to be the lifeblood of the American economy as we recover from the 2008 recession. The importance of small businesses cannot be understated. In the first three fiscal quarters of 2014, reports the Small Business Association, small businesses added 1.4 million new jobs, 39% of which were from very small businesses (with fewer than 50 people).

In the early stages of entrepreneurship, the chaos of managing your business can be overwhelming. Hiring, paying bills, and building a customer base take time and energy, and can often leave no time for complicated legal procedure. According to Austin business lawyers at Slater Pugh, Ltd. LLP, for medium and large sized businesses there are a range of legal issues which must occasionally be dealt with to ensure the ongoing success of the company. While you cannot avoid seeking legal advice forever, there are several tasks you can complete yourself to get your business on its feet. For example, creating a legal partnership agreement or limited liability corporation agreement can be done with the assistance of online legal resources and is essential to a successful business.

In addition, finances frequently seem too tight to afford a business lawyer. Investopedia outlines several generic costs that small business owners face. These include research expenses, borrowing costs, advertising and promotion, employee expenses, and technological expenses. With all these expenses, legal bills can become an afterthought.

Getting a lawyer for your small business is ultimately a preventative measure. You may not need them immediately, but they can help prepare you for the moment when you are dealing with a breach of contract or customer lawsuit. Do not be caught off guard; utilize legal services before it is too late for your business.

Fighting Charges Related to Controlled Substances

By on 8-05-2015 in Technology

According to the website of Horst Law, a conviction on any charges related to a controlled substance will have the potential to affect just about every aspect of your life. Bearing that in mind, you will need to do everything you can to defend yourself as you work your way through the coming legal process. In any event, it is important to remember you right to remain silent.

Defending Against Your Charges

As frightening as the possible consequences of a conviction can be, you need to remember that you have not been convicted of anything yet and that you will still have the opportunity to defend yourself against your charges. You may be facing accusations of something like:

  • Marijuana Possession
  • Cocaine Possession
  • Heroin Possession
  • Methamphetamine Possession
  • Controlled Substance/Drug Possession
  • Controlled Substance/Drug Sales
  • Controlled Substance/Drug Manufacturing / Delivery
  • Controlled Substance/Drug Traffic / Distribution
  • Controlled Substance/Drug Paraphernalia
  • Controlled Substance/Drug Importation

Whatever the particulars of your charges happen to be, you should be aware that the penalties for drug charges are lopsidedly stiff and overly harsh across the board.

Because of the nature of punishments for drug crimes, if you have been charged with any criminal offense associated with a controlled substance, you will need to do everything you can to defend yourself against the possible consequences of a conviction. Your future depends on your actions. These are serious charges with life-changing consequences, so it’s imperative that you fight them with as much vigor as possible.

Activities that may Lead to a Drug Crime

By on 8-05-2015 in Technology

Any drug-related activity, including manufacture, marketing, distribution, possession or use of illegal drugs and drug-related equipment, is considered a major offense in the U.S., is punished with a jail term and huge fines, and is sure to imprint a mark which will negatively affect one’s life for many years to come.

Being charged or convicted of a criminal offense, especially one that is related to illegal drugs can ruin one’s career and entail lots of limits and inconveniences, including difficulty in finding a decent place to live in, failing to qualify for financial aid for college, restrictions on international travel, difficulty in obtaining a professional license, and getting unfavorable results on issues of child custody and visitation rights.

One specific kind of drug that has been prohibited in the US is cocaine, the second most widely used illegal drug in the U.S. (the first is marijuana or cannabis). Cocaine has been classified by the US Controlled Substances Act (CSA) as a Schedule II drug, a type of drug that has a high potential for abuse; doctors, however, may administer it to patients for certain medical reasons. (The CSA, which is Title II of the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act, is a federal drug policy that was signed into law by the US Congress in 1970; this policy aims to regulate the importation, manufacture, possession, distribution and use of different substances.)

A website called Brent Horst Attorney At Law says that a person can also get arrested and charged with a drug crime if he or she:

  • is found in possession of a drug without a prescription;
  • gives his or her prescription drugs to someone else and this other person is harmed due to a bad reaction of the drug;
  • is found guilty of drug trafficking, which is characterized by the selling a of pills to someone else;
  • forges or alters a prescription or steals blank prescription forms; and,
  • drives under the influence of a prescription or illegal drug.

Substance abuse or drug-related crimes can have a long-term effect in any one’s life. A criminal charge as serious as one that involves drugs necessitates a very tough defense which may help save a person’s future from getting ruined. A person who has been charged but entrusts his or her court defense to an unexperienced criminal defense lawyer may very well close his door to a promising future. With a drug charge, it is either behind bars or a fulfilling life. A seasoned criminal defense lawyer may be able to help in making possible the latter.

Workplace Injury and Employer Liability

By on 8-05-2015 in Technology

According to the website of Williams Kherkher, worker’s compensation is one of the many benefits that each employed worker has, and they can avail of such benefit in the event of a workplace accident. It is given regardless of who caused the accident, and it will help provide for lost wages and medical expenses brought about by the accident. The accident does not have to occur within the workplace, either; worker’s compensation will include workers who got involved in an accident outside of the workplace as long as they are under their working hours and when they are doing their job.

It is important, though, that each company may have their own regulations regarding job-related injuries and how they define negligence and disregard of workplace safety rules. Almost all states require employers to get worker’s compensation for all their workers that are classified as employees, except for some employed workers who are not included according to the worker’s compensation requirements of the state such as seasonal workers, independent contractors, domestic workers, railroad workers, and many others. If you have filed for a workers’ compensation benefit, you don’t have legal right to sue your employer for personal injury since worker’s compensation also works as protection to the company.

Depending on the type of work you do and your relationship with the employer, you may have other alternatives to workers’ compensation especially for those who are not covered with workers’ compensation. Going online, you can have a free consultation and review of your claim from a lawyer, therefore your options are not really limited. Workers compensation may be a no-fault system, but intentional harm on the side of the employer can be grounds for lawsuits. it not only covers for physical harm but also emotional and mental distress that the employer can cause to the worker.